Journal du Cameroun
August 13, 2018

<https://www.journalducameroun.com/burkina-le-parc-darly-classe-reserve-de-biosphere-de-lunesco/>

Arly National Park, Burkina Faso’s largest wildlife reserve, is inscribed
on the UNESCO MAB World Network of Biosphere Reserves list, the Government
Information Service (GIS) announced in Ouagadougou on Monday.

“This international recognition came at the 30th session of the
International Coordinating Council for the Man and the Biosphere (MAB)
Program of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural
Organization (UNESCO) held from 23 to 28 July 2018 in Palembang, Indonesia,
“says the GIS.

Since July 25, 2018, the Arly National Park has been included in the list
of the World Network of Biosphere Reserves of the UNESCO MAB Program. This
is the second international recognition of the largest park in Burkina Faso
after its inscription on the UNESCO World Heritage List on July 7, 2017.

For the GIS, “this was made possible thanks to the preparation of a dossier
submitted by Burkina with the technical and financial support of the RBT /
WAP-GIZ project”.

This international recognition of Arly National Park reinforces its
reputation. It also offers him opportunities for technical and financial
support, sharing experiences and improving the park’s sustainable
management system.

Arly National Park is located in the eastern region of Burkina Faso, in the
heart of the W-Arly-Pendjari cross-border complex (WAP). It covers an
estimated area of 217 930 hectares.

It is one of the most important sites for the conservation of Burkina
Faso’s biological diversity, with emblematic species such as elephant,
lion, cheetah, leopard, etc.

UNESCO’s Man and the Biosphere (MAB) Program was launched in 1971. It is an
intergovernmental scientific program aimed at establishing a scientific
basis for improving human-nature relations at the global level.

The MAB concept is based on the principle of reconciling conservation and
development.The World Network of Biosphere Reserves has 886 biosphere
reserves in 122 countries around the world.